Building the walls

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Next I cut the voids in the walls. This greatly saves on weight and allows space for the insulation and wiring.

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Cutting the voids out with a router. Make sure you are aware of the saw horses underneath for every cut and be sure to have something to catch the falling pieces so they don’t bonce back at you while you have the router running.

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After the first wall was complete I used the first completed wall as the template so I was able to mirror them perfectly.

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I was worried about the rigidity of the sidewall with all those holes but it still feels quite strong and much lighter!

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Taking a break to dryfit the sidewall to the deck.

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  • It’s probably right in front of me somewhere but what did you skin the inside of the walls with?

    • 5’x5′ 1/8″ baltic birch plywood.

  • Ian Moore

    Hey Ryan,

    Just curious – you used epoxy on the edges of the walls where they come into contact with the metal frame. However later on for the interior of the trailer you used spar varnish. Any reason you can think of why the Minwax spar varnish wouldn’t work in place of the epoxy on the wall edges? I figure they are both means to solving the same problem of waterproofing the wood.

    • That should work fine but it is not a permanent water barrier for external uses and might need to be reapplied in the future. Since most water intrusion would occur on the edge that shouldn’t be an issue to reapply if needed. Take a look at Thompson’s Waterseal instead, it is meant for this purpose and might be a better solution.

      The reason I used epoxy was that I knew I would never have to think about it again, also I had it laying around and was eager to test it out 🙂